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Electric Vehicles Will Grow 40-fold by 2035 in Europe

Once electric vehicles penetration reaches 50% in an urban distribution network, uncontrolled charging could cause voltage deviations and affect the quality of the power supply. For this reason, the study explores several solutions: digitizing the grid to study customer behavior, installing smart chargers to manage capacity and prevent the grid from buckling, and integrating energy storage solutions.

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Electrification continues to make progress in its conquest of mobility. By 2021, one in five vehicles registered in Europe will be electric. From the current figure of 3.3 million, these vehicles are expected to reach 65 million by 2030 and to double to 130 million vehicles by 2035. In other words, they will increase almost 40-fold in the next 14 years.

This is revealed by a study by Eurelectric and EY presented today, which clarifies that for this volume of electric vehicles it will be necessary to install 65 million chargers, of which 85% will be residential, 6% will be in the workplace, 5% at the destination (semi-public charging) and 4% in the corridors on public road corridors.

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European electric grid will be able to support the increase in electric vehicles

The report also assures that the electric grid will remain stable despite this exponential growth if the deployment of recharging infrastructure keeps pace with the growth of the market for these vehicles.

To achieve this, it is urgent to address existing bottlenecks, such as delays in obtaining permits and grid connection of up to 36 months, financing constraints, availability and access to real estate in strategic charging locations, and interoperability restrictions.

However, once EV penetration reaches 50% in an urban distribution network, uncontrolled charging could cause voltage deviations and affect the quality of the power supply. For this reason, the study explores several solutions: digitizing the grid to study customer behavior, installing smart chargers to manage capacity and prevent the grid from buckling, and integrating energy storage solutions.

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Spain among the leaders

Currently, 66% of recharging points are concentrated in just five European countries, while 10 countries do not have a single recharging point for every 100 kilometers of road. In electric mobility, Germany, Italy, the United Kingdom, and the world leader, the Netherlands, stand out.

Looking ahead to the end of this decade, polarization will continue. EY points out that the UK, Germany, France, Italy, the Netherlands, and also Spain will account for around 60% of the total number of chargers. By 2035, Sweden, Poland, Portugal, and Denmark will join this list. The 10 countries will account for 70% of the Old Continent’s charger fleet.

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(Featured image by bixusas via Pixabay)

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First published in elEconomista.es, a third-party contributor translated and adapted the article from the original. In case of discrepancy, the original will prevail.

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Andrew Ross is a features writer whose stories are centered on emerging economies and fast-growing companies. His articles often look at trade policies and practices, geopolitics, mining and commodities, as well as the exciting world of technology. He also covers industries that have piqued the interest of the stock market, such as cryptocurrency and cannabis. He is a certified gadget enthusiast.