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3 tips that will help you define your brand voice

Your brand voice is an essential part of your business identity. Here are three steps to follow to create and define that voice.

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Creating your brand identity involves many different facets including the logo, taglines, website colors and brand voice.

Every brand has a voice. Your brand is unique, so your brand voice should be too. Your brand voice is the constant personality you use when communicating your message to the world.

From digital advertisements to social media posts to product packaging, it’s important to have one consistent and unique brand voice across all your marketing materials. Otherwise, you’ll end up with a muddled message that won’t resonate with your customers on any level.  

Here are some brand voice examples from well-known brands:

  • Dollar Shave Club: quirky, casual and fun.
  • Coca-Cola: friendly, optimistic and joyful.
  • Nike: inspiring, powerful and positive.
  • MailChimp: helpful, encouraging and funny.

No matter what you’re selling, you need to create an engaging brand voice that’s authentic to your values.

Here are three ways to make defining your brand voice easier:

1. Make your brand voice relevant.

Think about who uses your product or service. You want to define your brand voice to speak to your target audience and create an emotional connection to what you’re offering.

If your audience is millennials who love yoga, your voice is going to be different than if you’re targeting 40+ women shopping for clothing.

Some good questions to ask are:

  • How do your customers (or how do you want them to) define your brand identity?
  • What’s the greatest benefit your product or service provides to people?
  • How do you want people using your product or service to feel?
  • How does your product or service stand out from the competition?

Once you’ve answered questions like these, you can…

brand voice

Choose a few words that you want to describe your brand’s voice. (Photo by DepositPhotos)

2. Start with three words.

What three words do you want to reflect the personality of your brand? Three is the number commonly used by organizations to define brand voice. Choosing more will just duplicate what you already have or water down your core characteristics.

Here are some examples of words to describe brand voice:

  • Enthusiastic
  • Confident
  • Helpful
  • Innovative
  • Inspiring
  • Fun
  • Authoritative

Next, choose limitations for each word. For example, confident but not cocky. Funny but not silly. This will help you further define your brand identity and write targeted brand copy (or give your writers a guide when they’re writing your copy).

3. Implement your brand voice everywhere.

If you’re going to keep your brand voice consistent, you need to ensure every piece of writing reflects your brand’s personality.

This means looking at your website, emails, social media accounts, and print materials such as business cards. You may have to rewrite older copy to reflect your voice or create totally new content, but don’t skip this important detail.

Imagine getting an email with no defined brand voice or a totally different brand voice than the one you get on a company’s website – it’s jarring, confusing and doesn’t evoke a feeling of trust.

These three steps will help you define your brand voice as part of your bigger brand identity. Once you’ve defined your brand’s identity, you can start speaking to your customers in an authentic and compelling way.

(Featured image by DepositPhotos)

DISCLAIMER: This article expresses my own ideas and opinions. Any information I have shared are from sources that I believe to be reliable and accurate. I did not receive any financial compensation for writing this post, nor do I own any shares in any company I’ve mentioned. I encourage any reader to do their own diligent research first before making any investment decisions.

Susan Friesen, founder of the award-winning web development and digital marketing firm eVision Media, is a Web Specialist, Business & Marketing Consultant, and Social Media Advisor. She works with entrepreneurs who struggle with having the lack of knowledge, skill and support needed to create their online business presence. As a result of working with Susan and her team, clients feel confident and relieved knowing their online marketing is in trustworthy and caring hands so they can focus on building their business with peace of mind at having a perfect support system in place to guide them every step of the way.

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