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Legal Adult-Use Cannabis Sales Started in the State of Connecticut

Connecticut state officials said 40 more retail stores and dozens of other cannabis-related businesses could open by the end of 2023, but stores will need time to expand their operations and obtain state permits. A 2021 state report estimates that legal adult-use cannabis sales could generate about $26 million in tax revenue in fiscal 2024, and by 2026 that total could rise to $73 million.

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Nine medical cannabis dispensaries have been licensed to sell cannabis to adults 21 years of age or older and will be open to new customers in Connecticut.

As part of the legalization of recreational cannabis, nearly 44,000 convictions for possession of small amounts of cannabis have been completely or partially removed thanks to Connecticut’s new “clean slate” law.

Now, as adult-use cannabis sales begin in Connecticut, Department of Consumer Protection Commissioner Michelle Seagull has called on businesses and consumers to be responsible.

“This is intended for adults,” Seagull said. “There’s always a risk or concern that people won’t take responsibility as seriously as they should, and the product will get into the wrong hands.”

New Haven Police Chief Karl Jacobson said Monday that supplying marijuana to minors is illegal and will continue to be treated as a crime. He also said that cannabis products must remain unopened when transported in a car.

“One of the illegal things is, of course, driving under the influence,” he said. “But both passengers and drivers are not allowed to use marijuana while driving.”

He also said that cannabis cannot be smoked in places where smoking is prohibited, such as city parks, schools, and inside buildings.

read more about the legal cannabis market in Connecticut and find the most important cannabis news from around the world with the Hemp.im mobile app.

What Connecticut residents can buy

Initial sales of cannabis to adults will be limited to:

7 grams of cannabis
4 ml of vape pen cartridges
7 grams in pre-rolls
Food products that use no more than 7g of cannabis flower in their preparation
A combination of different types of products that together constitute no more than 7 grams of cannabis

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These limits are significantly lower than in the neighboring states of Massachusetts and New York. The Department of Consumer Protection said the limits will be reviewed and will likely be increased. The current limits are intended to ensure an adequate supply for both adult consumers and medical marijuana patients, who will still be able to purchase up to 140 grams per month.

Seagull said that all cannabis products will be clearly labeled and must be sold in packages that children will not be able to open.

Although there are limits on transactions, government officials said pharmacies will not record every sale. This means that customers could potentially go to one dispensary, buy 7 grams of cannabis, and then go to another dispensary and buy 7 grams again.

Seagull and the Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection have reported that they expect long queues at dispensaries. Several pharmacies encourage and even require online orders to be placed in advance.

Connecticut state officials said 40 more retail stores and dozens of other cannabis-related businesses could open by the end of 2023, but the stores will need time to expand their operations and obtain state permits.

A 2021 state report estimates that legal adult-use cannabis sales could generate about $26 million in tax revenue in fiscal 2024, and by 2026 that total could rise to $73 million.

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(Featured image by Kampus Production via Pexels)

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Helene Lindbergh is a published author with books about entrepreneurship and investing for dummies. An advocate for financial literacy, she is also a sought-after keynote speaker for female empowerment. Her special focus is on small, independent businesses who eventually achieve financial independence. Helene is currently working on two projects—a bio compilation of women braving the world of banking, finance, crypto, tech, and AI, as well as a paper on gendered contributions in the rapidly growing healthcare market, specifically medicinal cannabis.