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Syngenta Morocco and Agrin help small farmers to cope with the effects of the pandemic

Two Moroccon companies are committed to help small farmers tackle the difficult situation caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. The choice of the areas that will benefit from this donation was a delicate matter for the two operators, since they estimate that thousands of producers need it. Thus, the operation targeted two agricultural cooperatives in the regions of Saïss (Taounate) and Doukkala.

Helene Lindbergh

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Organized by Syngenta Morocco and Agrin Morocco, a distribution operation of high-performance wheat seeds to 220 farmers took place. The objective is to support small farmers facing the effects of the health crisis.

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Small Moroccon farmers supported to cope with the crisis caused by the pandemic

Syngenta Maroc and Agrin Maroc, two companies working in the agricultural sector, have jointly organized a distribution operation of high-performance wheat seeds for the benefit of two agricultural cooperatives. The operation consisted in the distribution of 440 quintals of high-performance wheat seeds with innovative protection against diseases, to the benefit of 220 producers in two regions of the kingdom.

“The objective is to support Moroccan farmers, especially the smallest among them, to cope with the effects of the COVID-19 crisis as well as the impacts of climate change, which materialized by two consecutive years of drought and a significant drop in production in cereal farming,” said Axel d’Hauthuille, Managing Director of Syngenta Morocco.

The choice of the areas that will benefit from this donation was a delicate matter for the two operators, since they estimate that thousands of producers need it. Thus, the operation targeted two agricultural cooperatives in the regions of Saïss (Taounate) and Doukkala. These two areas were particularly affected by the lack of water since there is no possibility of irrigation.

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“We knew these two cooperatives, which are small in size with well-supervised producers who are motivated to make technical progress and produce better. We are going to accompany them through the cycle to harvest so that they can generate decent yields,” said Syngenta’s CEO.

The agricultural sector is very important for the country’s GDP

Targeting wheat farmers in the Doukkala and Fez regions also aims to support a sector that is crucial to the country’s GDP growth, wealth creation and rural employment. It is at the heart of the government’s new strategy in the agricultural sector, the “Green Generation Plan,” which promotes sustainable agriculture that creates jobs and value, with a view to the emergence of a middle class in the rural world. 

The company Syngenta said it will invest $2 billion in sustainable agriculture by 2025

This operation is also part of The Good Growth Plan, promoted by the Syngenta group at the global level to encourage a more efficient and more ecological restart of the post-COVID-19 agricultural sector. Through this plan, launched in 2013, Syngenta commits to invest $2 billion in sustainable agriculture by 2025 to accelerate innovation for farmers, promote carbon-neutral agriculture, and help farmers work in safe and healthy conditions. The plan will also impact the agricultural sector through the on-the-ground efforts of Syngenta Morocco, its teams, and local partners for the benefit of farmers. 

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First published in LesEco.ma, a third-party contributor translated and adapted the article from the original. In case of discrepancy, the original will prevail.

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Helene Lindbergh is a published author with books about entrepreneurship and investing for dummies. An advocate for financial literacy, she is also a sought-after keynote speaker for female empowerment. Her special focus is on small, independent businesses who eventually achieve financial independence. Helene is currently working on two projects—a bio compilation of women braving the world of banking, finance, crypto, tech, and AI, as well as a paper on gendered contributions in the rapidly growing healthcare market, specifically medicinal cannabis.